Dhule

Dhule district is a district of Maharashtra state in western region of India. The city of Dhule is the administrative headquarters of the district.

The Dhule district previously comprised tracts of land predominantly inhabited by tribal population. The Dhule district was then bifurcated on 1 July 1998 into two separate districts now known as Dhule and Nandurbar, the latter comprising the tribal region. Agriculture remains the basic profession of the population in this district. Most parts of the district are not under irrigation and thus cultivation heavily depends on regular Monsoon or rain water. Apart from wheat, bajra, jowar or jwari, onion the most favored commercial crop is cotton. Majority of the population in the rural area speaks Ahirani (a dialect of Marathi) language, however Marathi is more widely spoken in the urban areas. Around 26.11% population of Dhule district resides in urban area.The Dhule District is a part of Maharashtra’s historical region of Khandesh. Although for administrative purpose it is now clubbed to Nashik Division.

In 2006 the Ministry of Panchayati Raj named Dhule one of the country’s 250 most backward districts (out of a total of 640).It is one of the twelve districts in Maharashtra currently receiving funds from the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme (BRGF).

According to the 2011 census Dhule district has a population of 2,048,781, roughly equal to the nation of Botswana or the US state of New Mexico.This gives it a ranking of 223rd in India (out of a total of 640).The district has a population density of 285 inhabitants per square kilometre (740/sq mi).Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011 was 19.96%.Dhule has a sex ratio of 941 females for every 1000 males, and a literacy rate of 74.61%.

Languages spoken include Ahirani, a Kandeshi tongue with approximately 780 000 speakers, similar to Marathi and Bhili; Bhilali, with 1 150 000 speakers; and three mutually unintelligible Bareli languages: Bareli Palya, a Bhil language with approximately 10 000 speakers centred in Madhya Pradesh; Bareli Pauri, with approximately 175 000 speakers, written in the Devanagari script; and Bareli Rathwi, with approximately 64 000 speakers.