Dimapur is the largest city in Nagaland, India. In the Middle Ages, it was the capital of the Dimasa Kachari rulers. In the heart of the town there is an old relic of the Dimasa Kachari Kingdom which speaks about the once prosperous era. It is located at WikiMiniAtlas25°54′45″N 93°44′30″E and is bounded by Kohima district on the south and east, Karbi Anglong district of Assam on the west, the Karbi Anglong and stretch of Golaghat District of Assam, in the west and the north. Dimapur, from a Kachari word ‘Dimasa’ after the river which flows through it, is the gateway to Nagaland and its only railhead. The city also has the only functional airport in the state.

Dimapur Jain Temple was built in 1947. The temple is architecturally very well built and has an impressive structure. The temple has some intricate glass work. The temple is considered very auspicious by the people of Dimapur.Principal deity is Lord Mahaveer. The temple was built by the tireless effort of Shri Phulchand Sethi, Shri Jethmal Sethi, Shri Udayram Chabra, Shri Chunnilal Sethi, Shri Kanhaiyalal Sethi and other Jain families present in Dimapur at that time.

Dimapur is a district of Nagaland which derives its name from the Dimasa Kachari dialect. Literally, Dimapur − dima means great river, and pur means city, altogether it means “city of great river” in Dimasa kachari dialect. It was one of the capitals of the Dimasa Kachari Kingdom. There are various tourist attractions in Dimapur, such as ancient villages, waterfalls, ruins of the Dimasa Kachari Kingdom, and the Kali Temple.

Niuland subdivision and Chumukedima Village is an ancient area with scenic beauty and waterfalls. The town of Medziphema, Kuhuboto, surrounded by villages like Sakipheto, Alato, Aoyimkum, Darogarjan, and Nihoto are visited by many tourists. The Kachari Ruins are visited for various temples, reservoirs and tanks that belonged to the Dimasa Kachari Kingdom. Noune resort, situated near Niuland, is an ideal place for boating. Niathu resort is the best resort in Dimapur so far.

Apart from these, Diphupar, Nichuguard, Sukhajan, Kuki Dolong, Thilixu and Seithekima Village are visited. Chekiye and Ruzaphema have bazaars, where tourists can purchase beautiful handicrafts.

The economic and developmental activities of Nagaland are centered around Dimapur. It is an important commercial centre for the region, acting as a gateway to Nagaland and the neighbouring state of Manipur. An increase of population and the related increase in the number of cars in the city has led to traffic jams in and around the Commercial areas of the city.You can Travel in the city By Auto Rickshaws or rickshaws.

The National Highway 39 that connects Kohima, Imphal and the Myanmar border at Moreh runs through Dimapur. NH 36 starts from Dimapur connecting Doboka and later Guwahati via NH 37.

Dimapur is the only city in Nagaland that is connected by both rail and air. There are direct train services to cities like Guwahati, Kolkata, New Delhi, Bangalore, Chandigarh, Amritsar, Dibrugarh and Chennai from Dimapur railway station.

Dimapur Airport is located at 3rd mile (NH 39). It is the only civil airport in the state and has flights to Kolkata, Delhi and Dibrugarh There are plans for expansion of the airport to meet international norms by buying land at Aoyimti village. Maintained by the Airports Authority of India, it is an important trade and commercial centre on National Highway No. 39, and wears a rather cosmopolitan look.

There are several schools and colleges in the city of Dimapur. The syllabus for education till Class 12 is taken care of by the Nagaland Board of School Education while the Nagaland University, Lumami controls all areas of further studies.There are also a few schools in Nagaland which follow the CBSE Curriculum. Dimapur Government College is the premier degree college of the town which was established in 1966. Patkai Christian College, the only autonomous college in the entire North East India is located 17 km from Central Dimapur. National Institute of Technology Nagaland was also set up in 2010 at Chumukedima, about 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) from Dimapur.