Jabalpur is a tier 2 city in the state of Madhya Pradesh, India. According to the 2011 census, it is the third-largest urban agglomeration in Madhya Pradesh and the country’s 37th-largest urban agglomeration.

Jabalpur is the administrative headquarters of Jabalpur district (the second-most-populous district in Madhya Pradesh) and the Jabalpur division. Historically, a center of the Kalchuri and Gond dynasties, the city developed a syncretic culture influenced by intermittent Mughal and Maratha rule. During the early nineteenth century, it was annexed by British India as Jubbulpore and incorporated as a cantonment town. Since Indian independence there have been demands for a separate state of Mahakoshal, with Jabalpur its capital. The High Court of Madhya Pradesh, headquarters of the West Central Railway and Army headquarters of five states (Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh, Orissa, Bihar and Jharkhand) are located in Jabalpur. The city is also home to the Gun Carriage Factory.

The city’s name is derived from the legendary sage Jaabaali, who is mentioned in the Ramayana, and may refer to Jaabaali’s tapasya-bhoomi (place of penance). According to Bhedaghat folklore, a small cave on the bank of the Narmada River was Jaabaali’s ashram. Variations of the name include Jabalipuram and Jubbulgarh, and under British rule the city was known as Jubbulpore. In 2006, the Jabalpur Municipal Corporation renamed the city Jabalipuram.

Mythology describes three asura (evil spirits) in the Jabalpur region who were defeated by Shiva.In Rupnath, 84 kilometres (52 mi) north of the city, Ashokan relics dating to 300 BCE have been found as evidence of the Maurya Empire (322 to 185 BCE). When the empire fell, Jabalpur became a city-state before it was ruled by the Satavahana dynasty (230 BCE to 220 CE). Local rulers, including the Bodhis and the Senas, followed before the region became a vassal state of the Gupta Empire (320 to 550)

In 2011, Jabalpur covered an area of 53 square kilometres (20 sq mi). The Jabalpur municipal corporation, the JMC, is charged with governance of the city’s civic and infrastructural assets. The corporation has two wings: deliberative and executive. The head of the executive wing is a municipal commissioner who is responsible for the corporation’s day-to-day operation and assists the deliberative wing in the decision-making process. The JMC council has one elected representative (corporator) from each ward. Council elections, by popular vote, are held every five years. A corporator from the majority party is selected as mayor.

Jabalpur’s hills, with their variety of minerals, draw geologists and archaeologists. The city is surrounded by low, rocky, barren hillocks. Its primary reservoirs (Khandari and Pariyat) are northeast of the city, and water is also drawn from the Narmada River by the public-health department.

Jabalpur has a humid subtropical climate typical of north-central India (Madhya Pradesh and southern Uttar Pradesh). Summer begins in late March, lasting until June. May is the hottest month, with the average temperature exceeding 45 °C (113 °F). Summer is followed by the southwest monsoon, which lasts until early October and produces 35 inches (889 mm) of rain from July to September. Average annual precipitation is nearly 55 in (1386 mm). Winter begins in late November, and lasts until early March. January is the coldest month, with an average daily temperature near 15 °C (59 °F).

Several television news channels have branches in the city.Various cable operators operate digital cable tv system in city.

Khoye ki Jalebi, a food popular in Madhya Pradesh, was reportedly invented by Harprasad Badkul in 1889 in his Badkul Halwai shop near the Kamaniya Gate. It is said that his early experiments to create a jalebi from khoya failed until he added tekhur, which may be eaten by fasting people avoiding grain, as a stabiliser.

Jabalpur became a center of higher education by the end of the 19th century, with institutions established by local citizens (such as the Hitkarini Sabha,founded in 1868) and the British (such as Robertson College, which began as a school in Sagar in 1836 and moved to Jabalpur in 1873). Jabalpur Engineering College was the first technical institution in central India established by the British. Scholars, authors and politicians such as Ravishankar Shukla, Rajneesh, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and Gajanan Madhav Muktibodh have emerged from the Hitakarini institutions. The Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing, Jabalpur (IIITD&M) was founded in 2005.