kempegowda-fort

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The Kempegowda Fort, located in Magadi town of Bangalore, was originally built by Kempe Gowda, the founder of Bangalore as a mud fort in 1537. It was converted by Haider Ali into a stone fort in 1761, the work for which was finally completed by Tipu Sultan in 1791. Historically a bastion of the fearless Sultan, the fort was seized upon by the army of the British East India Company during the Third Mysore War fought between 1790 and 1792. The Kempegowda Fort is believed to have served as a place of refuge to the people of the town it fortified, if and when the town came under attack.

Unfortunately, a large portion of Kempegowda Fort lies in ruins today, with only parts of the fort having survived the test of time, silently affirming to the battles of the valorous Sultan with the British Empire. Renowned for its intrinsically carved arches inspired by Islamic architecture, and for the still standing Ganapati temple built in the 16th century, the fort was originally designed with four gates that served as outlets, one pointing in each direction. Only the North gate of the fort remains to be breached, persisting on Krishnarajendra Road, with a marble plaque marking the spot of breach in the fort wall, which lead to its annexation by the British. Also worth looking at is a nearby wooden palace of Tipu Sultan, which served as his summer home, as well as his armoury that is now preserved in the old fort area.

A fort of colossal historical significance, which gives the inquisitive visitor a rare insight of the history of the modern city of Bangalore, the place is a must visit for everyone planning to make a stop at Bangalore.

The best time to visit Kempegowda Fort is during winter months from November to January when the weather is at its best.

The fort has provided the setting for the treasure hunt in the book ‘Riddle of the Seventh Stone’ by Monideepa Sahu.

The fort remains open between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.