Manipur
Manipur

Manipur is a state in northeastern India, with the city of Imphal as its capital. Manipur is sometimes called alternative names such as Kangleipak or Sanaleibak.It is bounded by Nagaland to the north, Mizoram to the south, and Assam to the west; Burma lies to its east. The state covers an area of 22,327 square kilometres (8,621 sq mi). Its people include the Meetei, Kuki, Naga, and Pangal peoples, who speak Sino-Tibetan languages.

Manipur

Since ancient times, the Meetei people have lived in the valleys of Manipur alongside the Nagas, and Kukis in the hills and valley in peace. Meetei Pangal (Muslim) people settled in the valleys during the reign of Meidingu Khagemba in the year 1606. Since then, they also lived along with the Meetei People.Mythological origins begins with the reign of the “Konchin Tukthapa Ipu Athoupa Pakhangpa” (Pakhangpa was the name given to him meaning “The one who knows his father”), who gave birth the seven clans of Meetei society.The pre-Hindu era is set forth in the sacred writing puya “Wakoklon Heelel Thilel Salai Amailon Pukok”. Introduction of the Vaishnavism school of Hinduism brought about changes in the history of the state. Manipur’s early history is set forth in the Cheitharon Kumbaba, a chronicle of royal events which is believed to record events from the foundation of the ruling dynasty.Manipur became a princely state under British rule in 1891; the last of the independent states to be incorporated into British India. During the Second World War, Manipur was the scene of battles between Japanese and Allied forces. The Japanese were beaten back before the Allies could enter Imphal. This proved to be one of the turning points of the War.After the war, the Manipur Constitution Act, 1947, established a democratic form of government with the Maharaja as the Executive Head and an elected legislature. In 1949, Maharaja Budhachandra was summoned to Shillong, capital of the Indian province of Meghalaya where he signed a Treaty of Accession merging the kingdom into India. Thereafter the legislative assembly was dissolved and Manipur became part of the Republic of India in October, 1949.It was made a union territory in 1956 and a full-fledged state in 1972.Mohammed Alimuddin became the first Chief Minister in 1972 of the State of Manipur.

Manipur

Sangai

The sangai is an endemic, rare and endangered subspecies of brow-antlered deer found only in Manipur, India. It is also state animal of Manipur.Its common English name is Manipur brow-antlered deer and the scientific name, Rucervus eldii eldii McClelland. It lives in the marshy wetland in Keibul Lamjao about 45 km from Imphal. Its habitat is located in the southern parts of the Loktak Lake, which is the largest freshwater lake in eastern India. It is also one of the seven Ramsar sites of international importance. The habitat of the sangai is now protected as the Keibul Lamjao National Park. The sangai is also the state animal of Manipur.

Mrs. Hume’s pheasant

Mrs. Hume’s pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), also known as Hume’s pheasant or bar-tailed pheasant, is a large, up to 90 cm long, forest pheasant with a greyish brown head, bare red facial skin, chestnut brown plumage, yellowish bill, brownish orange iris, white wingbars and metallic blue neck feathers. The male has a long greyish white, barred black and brown tail. The female is a chestnut brown bird with whitish throat, buff color belly and white-tipped tail.This rare and little known pheasant is found throughout forested habitats in China, India, Burma and Thailand. The diet consists mainly of vegetation matters. The female lays three to twelve creamy white eggs in nest of leaves, twigs and feathers.

Manipur
Manipur

Toona

Toona, commonly known as redcedar,toon (also spelled tun) or toona, is a genus in the mahogany family, Meliaceae, native from Afghanistan south to India, and east to North Korea, Papua New Guinea and eastern Australia.In older texts, the genus was often incorporated within a wider circumscription of the related genus Cedrela, but that genus is now restricted to species from the Americas.

shirui lily

The Shirui lily or Siroi lily (Lilium mackliniae) is a rare Indian species of plant found only in the upper reaches of the Siroi hill ranges in the Ukhrul district of Manipur, India, at an elevation of 1,730–2,590 metres (5,680–8,500 ft) above sea level. It is located near the boundary of Myanmar to the east, Shiroi village in the west, Choithar village in the south and Sihai village in the north.

Manipur

Tulihal Airport, Changangei, Imphal, the only airport of Manipur, connects directly with Delhi, Kolkata, Guwahati, and Agartala. It has been upgraded as an International airport. As India’s second largest airport in the northeast, it serves as a key logistical centre for northeastern states.

National Highway NH-39 links Manipur with the rest of the country through the railway stations at Dimapur in Nagaland at a distance of 215 km (134 mi) from Imphal. National Highway 53 (India) connects Manipur with another railway station at Silchar in Assam, which is 269 km (167 mi) away from Imphal. The road network of Manipur, with a length of 7,170 km (4,460 mi) connects all the important towns and distant villages.In 2010, Indian government announced that it is considering an Asian infrastructure network from Manipur to Vietnam.The proposed Trans-Asian Railway (TAR), if constructed, will pass through Manipur, connecting India to Burma, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore.

Manipur

Cuisine

Manipuri cuisines are simple,tasty,organic and healthy. Dishes are typically spicy foods that use chili pepper rather than garam masalas hence healthy, simple and organic foods. Most of the cuisines doesn’t use oil as its ingredients.

Attire

The costumes of Manipur carry their own unique characteristics. Stressed on its functionality, the traditional Manipuri costumes are simple and easy to wear. A traditional Manipuri costume for women includes a shawl called Innaphi, a Phanek and a wrap around skirt called sarong. A Manipuri man wears a dhoti, a jacket and a white Pagri or turban.

Manipur
Manipur

Dance

Manipuri dance is one of the major Indian classical dance forms. It originates from Manipur, a state in north-eastern India on the border with Burma. In Manipur, surrounded by mountains and geographically isolated at the meeting point of the orient and mainland India, the form developed its own specific aesthetics, values, conventions and ethics. The cult of Radha and Krishna, particularly the raslila, is central to its themes but the dances, unusually, incorporate the characteristic cymbals (kartal or manjira) and double-headed drum (pung or Manipuri mrdanga) of sankirtan into the visual performance. Guru Naba Kumar, Guru Bipin Singh, Rajkumar Singhajit Singh, his wife Charu Sija Mathur, Darshana Jhaveri, Elam Endira Devi,Yumlembam Gambhini Devi and Sougaijam Thanil Singh are some of the prominent exponents of this classical dance form.

Literature

Manipuri literature is the literature written in the Manipuri language (i.e. Meeteilon), including literature composed in Manipuri language by writers from Manipur, Assam, Tripura, Myanmar and Bangladesh. It is also known as Meetei Literature. The history of Manipuri literature can be traced back thousands of years with the flourishing of its civilisation. Nevertheless, Puya Meithaba (burning of ancient Manipuri scriptures) cannot be overlooked in the history of Manipuri Literature.The terror event of history, the Puya Meithaba in 1729, during the reign of Meidingu Pamheiba (1709–1748), totally devastated the ancient Manipuri scriptures and cultural history. It began a new era of Manipuri literature. Most of the early literary works found in Manipuri Literature were in poetry and prose

Manipur