nagula-chaviti-festival

Nagula Chavithi is a Hindu observance dedicated to Nagas or Snakes in Telugu culture. Nagula Chavithi 2016 date is November 3. Naagula Chaviti is observed on the fourth day after Diwali in Kartik month (October – November). It is mainly observed in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and adjoining areas and on this day Nagas (Cobras) are worshipped. In many regions, it is a three day festival – Nagula Chavithi is followed by Naga Panchami and Naga Sashti on the following days. In 2016, the date of Nagula Chavithi is November 3 , Naga Panchami date is November 4 and Naga Sashti date is November 5.
The popular legend associated with Nagula Chavithi in Telugu Hindu culture suggests that on the day Lord Shiva drank the poison Halahala or Kalkuta to save the universe during the famous incident of Samudra Manthan.

Pujas and prayers are held in Naga temples across the state. People offer pujas near sacred spots associated with snakes like anthills, groves and other sacred spots. Stop the Practice of Feeding of Snakes during Festivals
Nowadays, Nagula Chavithi day is noted for the notorious practice of offering milk and eggs to the snakes, especially cobras near snake pits. Snake charmers also bring cobras to villages and towns which are fed with milk by devotees. Such practices should not be encouraged as it leads to the death of snakes.
Snakes don’t drink milk but the practice has been encouraged by popular beliefs.

Worship of Nagas is a constant reminder to humans to live in harmony with Nature. And the ideal way to worship Nagas is by protecting the forests and grooves that are home of snakes and other animals.
Nagula Chavithi is observed on the fourth day after Deepavali Amavasya during Karthika masam. Nagula Chavithi is a festival to worship Nag Devatas (Serpent Gods) which is mainly observed by married women for the wellbeing of their children. Nagula Chavithi is a major festival in Andhra Pradesh and some parts of Karnataka.

It is believed that any Puja offered to snakes would reach to the serpent Gods. Hence people worship live snakes on the day as representative of serpents Gods who are revered and worshipped in Hinduism.