Rose-Ringed Parakeet

The Indian Ringneck Parakeets have been held in admiration and esteem since ancient times. They are a large parakeet, sought after for the superiority in their form and beauty, their ability to speak, their intelligence and trainability, and because they are easy to breed. The Indian Ringneck Parakeet has been a long time favorite for bird lovers.

Indian Ringnecks are available in shades ranging from bright yellows, greens, and blues, to albinos. Like a few other bird species, they are known as dimorphic, meaning that a bird’s sex can be determined by its colors and markings. Males sport deep red beaks, black facial markings, and three bands or color around their necks. Females, while still beautiful, lack the facial and collar bands, although some do display a barely slight darkening of color around their necks.

The Indian Ringneck Parakeet originated in Ceylon. To be more precise, Indian Ringnecks are native to Asia and Africa and can be seen in the forests or arid environments. It’s not uncommon to see them thrive in urban areas as well. They have established colonies in environments, which are not native to them, some major points of interest include California, Florida, and the UK.

Continued daily handling is necessary to retain their friendly, gentle nature of your Indian Ringneck Parakeet. If subjected to the amount of attention required only by daily necessary chores of watering, feeding and cage maintenance, they will undoubtedly become nippy and unfriendly quite quickly.

To maintain a bond with the owner these social creatures must be given adequate quality attention and play time on a daily basis. Like all Ringneck Parakeets the Indian Ringneck is easy to teach and tame. These beautiful birds are also quite hardy making them favorites for novice and expert hobbyists alike.

Although the Indian Ringneck has something of a reputation for being nippy and hard to tame, it is largely undeserved. Because they are so smart, Indian Ringnecks get bored very easily, and will often resort to chewing and other destructive behavior if left to their own devices. They also go through a bluffing stage during adolescence that is difficult for some owners to manage. Indian Ringnecks that are handled often and properly cared for, however, generally have sweet, charming personalities that make them a favorite of bird enthusiasts everywhere.

ndian Ringnecks are intelligent parrots and do make great pets. They learn concepts quickly and love to show off. Along with being intelligent, they are great at talking. Quaker Parakeets are known for their talking ability; however, an Indian Ringneck can speak with clarity that’s phenomenal.

These birds are truly masters at talking for their size and can easily compete with Quakers, Grays, and Amazons. With adequate attention, handling, and love, an Indian Ringneck Parakeet can quickly become a beloved companion and family member.

Rose-ringed Parakeets are avid chewers and climbers and should have access to chewing toys in their cages. To this end, it is important to provide plenty of bird-safe chewable wood (toys made from wood or bird-safe tree branches) and pine cones that were cleaned / heat sterilized to allow them to satisfy their natural urge to chew. Additionally, they enjoy vegetable tanned leather toys, push and pull toys, foot toys, climbing ropes, ladders and swings.

Small seed mixture such as: canary, millet, small amounts of oats, buckwheat, safflower, sunflower; spray millet, green leaves, seeding grasses; variety of fruits such as: apple, orange, banana if accepted; complete kibble.

Captive Rose-ringed Parakeets should be fed a nutritionally balanced diet of pellets* and unfortified / organic seeds, and fresh fruits, vegetables and greenfood should be made available. They love nuts – but those should only be given as treats.

Rose-ringed Parakeets are avid chewers and climbers and should have access to chewing toys in their cages. To this end, it is important to provide plenty of bird-safe chewable wood (toys made from wood or bird-safe tree branches) and pine cones that were cleaned / heat sterilized to allow them to satisfy their natural urge to chew. Additionally, they enjoy vegetable tanned leather toys, push and pull toys, foot toys, climbing ropes, ladders and swings.

The rose-ringed parakeet is sexually dimorphic. The adult male sports a red or black neck ring and the hen and immature birds of both sexes either show no neck rings, or display shadow-like pale to dark grey neck rings. Both sexes have a distinctive green colour. Rose-ringed parakeets measure on average 40 cm (16 in) in length, including the tail feathers, a large portion of their total length. Their average single-wing length is about 15–17.5 cm. In the wild, this is a noisy species with an unmistakable squawking call. It is herbivorous and not migratory.

One of the few parrot species that have successfully adapted to living in disturbed habitats, it has withstood the onslaught of urbanisation and deforestation. As a popular pet species, escaped birds have colonised a number of cities around the world. Since the population appears to be increasing, the species was evaluated as being of least concern by the IUCN in 2012, but its popularity as a pet and unpopularity with farmers have both reduced its numbers in some parts of its native range.

In the wild, rose-ringed parakeets usually feed on buds, fruits, vegetables, nuts, berries, and seeds. Wild flocks also fly several miles to forage in farmlands and orchards, causing extensive damage. In India, they feed on cereal grains, and during winter also on pigeon peas. In Egypt during the spring, they feed on mulberry and in summer they feed on dates and nest inside palm trees and eat from sunflower and corn fields.

In north-west India, Indian rose-ringed parakeets form pairs from September to December. They do not have life mates and often breed with another partner during the following breeding season. During this cold season, they select and defend nest sites, thus avoiding competition for sites with other birds. Feeding on winter pea crops provides the female with nutrients necessary for egg production. From April to June, they care for their young. Fledgings are ready to leave the nest before monsoon.