Tomb-of-Salabat-Khan

Salabat Khan’s Tomb, also known as Chand Bibi, at Mehekri, near Ahmadnagar in Maharashtra, taken by Henry Cousens in the 1880s. Burgess states in the Revised List of Antiquarian Remains in the Bombay Presidency (1897), “Mehekri, 7 miles east from Ahmadnagar. Salabat Khan’s tomb, commonly called Chand Bibi’s Mahal, an octagonal dome surrounded by a three-storeyed verandah: it is 100 feet high and about the same in maximum diameter; now used as a military sanitarium.” Precedent for this use of an octagonal verandah acting as a screen around a domed chamber within was set in the Deccan with the fifteenth-century tomb of Shaikh Khalilullah at Ashtur outside Bidar. The device is primarily a visual one, with the octagonal outer screen adding height and grandeur to what may have been a more modest structure within.

Salabat Khan’s Tomb, also known as Chand Bibi, at Mehekri, near Ahmadnagar in Maharashtra, taken by Henry Cousens in the 1880s. Burgess states in the Revised List of Antiquarian Remains in the Bombay Presidency (1897), “Mehekri, 7 miles east from Ahmadnagar. Salabat Khan’s tomb, commonly called Chand Bibi’s Mahal, an octagonal dome surrounded by a three-storeyed verandah: it is 100 feet high and about the same in maximum diameter; now used as a military sanitarium.” Precedent for this use of an octagonal verandah acting as a screen around a domed chamber within was set in the Deccan with the fifteenth-century tomb of Shaikh Khalilullah at Ashtur outside Bidar. The device is primarily a visual one, with the octagonal outer screen adding height and grandeur to what may have been a more modest structure within.

Salabat Khan’s Tomb, also known as Chand Bibi, at Mehekri, near Ahmadnagar in Maharashtra, taken by Henry Cousens in the 1880s. Burgess states in the Revised List of Antiquarian Remains in the Bombay Presidency (1897), “Mehekri, 7 miles east from Ahmadnagar. Salabat Khan’s tomb, commonly called Chand Bibi’s Mahal, an octagonal dome surrounded by a three-storeyed verandah: it is 100 feet high and about the same in maximum diameter; now used as a military sanitarium.” Precedent for this use of an octagonal verandah acting as a screen around a domed chamber within was set in the Deccan with the fifteenth-century tomb of Shaikh Khalilullah at Ashtur outside Bidar. The device is primarily a visual one, with the octagonal outer screen adding height and grandeur to what may have been a more modest structure within.