The most dramatic event in Digboi’s history took place during the World War II days when the belligerent Japanese got closer and were within three days marching distance of Digboi. These images come back as one kneels at the headstones at the Digboi War Cemetry, praying for a young life nipped in the bud at battle in a strange land far, far away from home.,/p>

Gauhati, the capital city of the state of Assam in North East India is on the Eastern side of the River Brahmaputra some 600 kilometres east of Calcutta. It is best reached by air either from Delhi or Calcutta.

The war cemetery is in the residential area of Silpukhuri on Navagraha Road, leading to Navagraha Hindu Temple which is situated on the hill top past the war cemetery.

Gauhati War Cemetery was started during the Second World War for burials from the several military hospitals posted in the area. Later, other graves were brought in by the Army Graves Service from Amari Bari Military Cemetery, Sylhet Military Cemetery, Mohachara Cemetery, Nowgong Civil Cemetery and Gauhati Civil Cemetery, where permanent maintenance could not be assured. For the same reason, further graves were brought to the cemetery from isolated sites in the Lushai Hills and from civil cemeteries in Badarpur, Cooch Bahar, Darjeeling, Dhubri, Dibrugarh, Dinjan, Katapahar, Lebong, Lumding, Shillong and Silchar, in 1952.

There are now 486 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 25 of the burials are unidentified. The cemetery also contains 24 Chinese war graves, and two non-war graves.